Tuna and Rice Salad

Tuna and Rice Salad

What do you do when you one have one can of Tuna and a lot of people to  serve? Do you run to the store for another one?  No!  Instead, add something extra to stretch it so that your Tuna Salad for three can become Tuna Salad for 6.   This little secret ingredient can also help to stretch your grocery dollars. 

Tuna and Rice SaladThis discovery was made one day when the scenario described above actually occurred.   I had one can of tuna and I needed to have tuna for 5.    In desperation, I looked around to see what I had available in my refrigerator and pantry to add to the recipe, and that was when I saw a container of cooked brown rice leftover from the night before.      I decided to add some of the cooked rice to see if this tuna salad extender would go unnoticed by my diners.    On the first occasion that I did this, I eyeballed the amount of cooked brown rice that I added and attempted to make it equal to the amount of tuna.

Tuna and Rice SaladOnce the rice was added, I added the usual additions to my tuna salad–finely diced celery, onion, and hard boiled eggs.  Then, I deviated from my usual tuna recipe.  Instead of adding sweet relish, I added a little juice from a jar of kosher dills.  I chose the juice from these pickles because of the added garlic.  We really love garlic here at Patty Cake’s Pantry.  I also added a little bit of celery salt to add a little more depth of flavor.    Everything was mixed up with mayonnaise, and I put the salad into the fridge to chill before serving.Tuna and Rice Salad

When Baker’s Man tasted the salad, he thought that it was chicken salad instead of tuna.  For people who love tuna, this might not be a good thing, but if you have a child or family member who isn’t a fan of tuna, this variation of tuna salad may turn out to be the perfect recipe.Tuna and Rice Salad

This is great in sandwiches, with crackers, and on salads.  My favorite way to have this salad is stuffed inside of half an avocado that’s nestled on top of a green salad.

Give this recipe for stretched tuna salad a try and let us know what you think by leaving a comment below.

Thanks for visiting Patty Cake’s Pantry.

Tuna and Rice Salad
Author: 
Recipe type: Sandwich Filling, Salad
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 6
 
The addition of cooked brown rice to tuna salad helps to extend it to feed more people from a single can. It also has the additional benefit of decreasing the fishy taste that sometimes is associated with tuna salad. Some of my taste testers have been convinced that they were eating chicken salad. The total cost of this recipe is $2.07 or $0.35 per serving (not including bread).
Ingredients
  • 1 (7 ounce) can chunk light tuna in water ($0.99)
  • ⅓ cup diced onion ($0.09)
  • ½ cup diced celery (($0.07)
  • 1-2 hard boiled eggs, diced ( optional) ($0.22)
  • ½ cup cooked brown rice (you can add up to ¾ cup if you like) ($0.21)
  • ⅛ - ¼ teaspoon celery salt (to taste) ($0.01)
  • 1½ tablespoons pickle juice (from a jar of dill pickles--I like the juice from kosher dills) ($0.01)
  • ½ cup mayonnaise (to taste) ($0.47)
Instructions
  1. Dice onion, celery, and eggs.
  2. Drain tuna to remove water.
  3. Place Tuna into a bowl and fluff with a fork.
  4. Add celery, onion, eggs, celery salt, cooked brown rice, and pickle juice.
  5. Stir well to combine.
  6. Add mayonnaise and stir until completely incorporated.
  7. Chill until serving. Stir before adding it to a sandwich, salad, or stuffing into an avocado or tomato.

Tuna and Rice Salad--Adding rice to tuna reduces the fishy taste

Nutritional information is for recipe made with 1/2 cup cooked brown rice, and 1 hard boiled egg.

Nutrition Facts
Amount Per Serving
Calories 148
% Daily Value
Total Fat 7.5g
10%
Saturated Fat 1.2g
6%
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 50mg
18%
Sodium 293mg
13%
Total Carbohydrates 11.2g
4%
Dietary Fiber 0.7g
3%
Sugars 1.8g
Protein 8.4g
Vitamin A 4%
Vitamin C 1%
Calcium 2%
Iron 3%

4 thoughts on “Tuna and Rice Salad

    1. I’ve considered filling tomatoes, but love them too much to scoop out the centers. I usually heap it into a tomato that’s been partially sliced into eighths from the top down. I love your food icons. I want them for my phone.

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